HERE IN THE HYPERTEXT OF OUR EVERYDAY LIVES
AGATHA GOTHE-SNAPE, BRIAN FUATA, CHRISTOPHER LG HILL, CLARK BEAUMONT,
TIM GREGORY AND TIMOTHY D

29 October - 2 November

Opening night Wednesday 29 Oct 6-8PM

“Who are the VR fashion models of the future & will they love me?”

Here in the Hypertext of Our Everyday Lives presents six artists working in an online context. When we talk about real world vs. the virtual we can find ourselves constantly negotiating shaky territory - qualifying statements in a loop of renegotiated understanding of what is and is not actual. We ask ourselves, “Where does this cyber realm sits in relation to a real world?” Through these artists we are chanced to see the Everyday become the (cyber)Everyday and our communication with this space as simultaneously quotidian and loaded. Within this space of the (cyber)everyday we find a poetics of connection.

“What’s a nice VO like you doing in a place like this?”

Agatha Gothe-Snape, Brian Fuata, Christopher LG Hill, Clark Beaumont, Tim Gregory and Timothy D each negotiate this space. Varying approaches, from performative emails to captured web-cam footage, through various platforms such as Twitter, YouTube and PowerPoint, offer the chance to reflect on the space of the Internet not only as an aesthetic playground but also as one of daily, personal interaction. Here in the Hypertext of Our Everyday Lives, curated by Bradley Vincent, brings together their work in the hope of focusing on this everyday, personal potential.

Agatha Gothe-Snape appears courtesy The Commercial (Sydney)

Tim Gregory appears courtesy Chalk Horse (Sydney)

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HOUSE WIGGER
JASON WING
5-16 November

Opening night Wednesday 5 Nov 6-8PM

Borrowing its title from an anonymous online comment made about the artist’s physical appearance, 'House Wigger' is an exhibition of new work by Sydney-based Aboriginal artist Jason Wing. Shortly after winning the 2012 Parliament of NSW Aboriginal Art Prize for his controversial work depicting Captain Cook as an armed bandit, Wing became the target of Internet trolling and cyber bullying.

Transforming these dehumanising remarks into subtle embossings, Wingspeaks not only to the invisibility of online abuse, but also to thescars that may be left behind. In a new sound installation the artist conducts a self-styled therapy session, whereby he continuously repeats the racist comments that were directed towards him. In undergoing this process of desensitisation and reclamation, the very words set out to cause harm are no longer a source of pain. Like the age-old adage ‘sticks and stones may break my bones’, Wing defies any person who attempts to deny him his identity. Despite the inherently dark undercurrent in 'House Wigger', ultimately Wing seeks to overturn this negativity and draw attention to the demoralising racism that exists within the Australian zeitgeist.

http://www.jasonwing.net/

RSVP on Facebook.

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ALASKA CINEMA CLUB FILM #8
METROPOLITAN (1990)

6:00pm Thursday 6 November
Bon Marche Studio (UTS)
Building 3, 755 Harris Street Sydney, Broadway 2007
FREE

At ALASKA Cinema Club next up is another story about youth — albeit very different in tone from our previous outing with Larry Clark and Harmony Korine’s Kids (1995). Metropolitan, written and directed by Whit Stillman is the first of a trilogy of 1990s films concerning the ‘Urban Haute Bourgeoisie’. The film centres around a young, well educated preppy band of Upper East Side Manhattanites who are home on Christmas break from college during the debutante ball season.

Stillman describes his film as ‘a costume picture set in the present day or recent past’. It formed part of the 1990s low-budget wave, financed by family and friends in a pre-crowdfunding era. The film proved both a financial and critical success paving the way for Stillman’s Barcelona (1994) and The Last Days of Disco (1998) in rapid succession. These three films are part of the permanent film library at MOMA.

Novelist Luc Sante writing on the film says, ‘Nowadays, you might wonder whether there is anyone left on Park Avenue whose fortune antedates the second Reagan administration. New money is so loud or insistent that old money has either slipped away to ancestral hideouts or has, as it were, gone native. Metropolitan, which looked like a perverse bit of daring in 1990, now seems like an artefact from an earlier century.’

In conversation to introduce the film: Dr Alex Munt (UTS) with Jason Di Rosso - filmmaker, broadcaster and chief film critic for Radio National, ABC and host of The Final Cut.

RSVP on Facebook.

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ALASKA X FREE FALL @ THE OXFORD ART FACTORY
DON'T SAY YOU MISS ME ON A MONDAY...
CURATED BY BRIDIE CONNELL

PART ONE: OCTOBER - NOVEMBER 2014

From an underground carpark in the red light district to a basement-style live music venue on Sydney’s most infamous nightclub strip, Season 3 of Free Fall unites two of Sydney’s most successful, yet unexpected artist run spaces – ALASKA Projects, Kings Cross, and The Cube Space in Oxford Art Factory, Oxford Street.

Curated by ALASKA artist and performer Bridie Connell, this season embraces the inner city for all its grime and glory, not only as a place with a rich history of underground performance, but also as a place where people flock on the weekend in search of an escape from the 9-5 grind.

Intoxication, infatuation, lock-outs, love-ins, romance, heartbreak, sirens, silence. Friday. Saturday. Sunday. Sleep. Don’t say you miss me on a Monday.

PART ONE: All performances are FREE and take place on Friday and Saturday nights between 10:30pm and 12am.

COMING UP:
31 October - 1 November - Alex Munt feat. Gracie Otto
7-8 November - Betty Grumble

FREE FALL on Facebook.

Free Fall is an artist run initiative conceived by artist John A Douglas presenting experimental contemporary live performance and installation to a broader audience, reaching beyond the confines of the gallery white cube. Since 2011 the Free Fall programs have seen over 70 artists perform in the glass cube at The Oxford Art Factory working in a range of interdisciplinary practices from emerging to mid career.

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